Men

Prostate Health

The National Prostate Cancer Coalition reports that one in six men will get prostate cancer, but if caught early, nearly 100% survive. The risk of prostate cancer increases with age and obesity. Doctors recommend annual PSA tests after age 50.

Prostate Testing

The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement is a blood test. PSA is an enzyme measured in the blood that can rise naturally as men age or if prostate abnormalities are present. Elevated levels often indicate prostate cancer, but may be related to other problems such as infection. Clinicians use the PSA in conjunction with other tests to assess prostate health.

The PSA, for males age 50 and over, is a blood test to be used as a screening tool by physicians and should only be used in conjunction with a doctor's physical exam.

Fasting is required for the basic blood profile. Therefore, participants should not eat or drink anything other than water for 8 to 12 hours prior to the blood draw. Test results will sent by mail to participants and their physicians.

The Department reminds residents that they offer the PSA blood test in conjunction with an in-depth Chem Screen/CBC basic blood profile.

Make an Appointment

Appointments for the blood draws may be made by calling the Health Department at 852-5272.

Prostate Cancer

According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Prostate Cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed form of cancer. Among men it is second only to lung cancer as a cause for cancer-related death among men.

Age, race, ethnicity, and family history are factors that affect the risk of prostate cancer. About 80% of all men with clinically diagnosed prostate cancer are aged 65 years or older.

Often early cancer of the prostate has no symptoms.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, afflicting 1 out of every 11 American men and killing 34,000 men every year. For African-American men, the rate of affliction is even worse; African-American men have the highest incidence of prostate cancer in the world.

Though the life expectancy gap between men and women has shrunk to 5.2 years, the narrowest since 1946 - men still need to pay more attention to their bodies. Why? Well, men tend to:

  • Smoke and drink more than women, and generally lead less healthy lifestyles.
  • Not seek medical help as often as women.
  • Join in fearless, risky, and dangerous behaviors more often than women.

The Health Departments note that as many people consider the status of health care today; the issues of prevention and early detection of disease will become increasingly important in the future of effective health care and savings of health care dollars.

The shift to a mentality of prevention requires not only changes in the health care system, but also an awareness by the American public of the importance of regular visits to their health care provider. This fact is especially important when we view the subject of men's health.

To illustrate this point the Department staff notes the following statistics:

  • Women visit the doctor 150% as often as men enabling them to detect health problems in their early stages.
  • Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, afflicting 1 out of every 11 American men and killing 34,000 men every year. For African-American men, the rate of affliction is even worse; African-American men have the highest incidence of prostate cancer in the world.
  • If prostate cancer is detected early it can be treated effectively, but early prostate cancer has no symptoms.
  • Significant numbers of male related health problems; such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and colon cancer could be detected and treated if menąs awareness of these problems was more pervasive.
  • Appropriate use of tests such as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) exams, blood pressure screenings, cholesterol checks, etc, in conjunction with clinical examination can result in the detection of many of problems in their early stages and increase survival rates to nearly 100%.